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History of Ed Parker's Kenpo in Europe

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Written by Rainer Schulte Monday, 10 August 2009 10:59

In consultation with senior members of the Irish and American Kenpo community and acting upon information which has been provided to me in recent times from many sources in Europe and America, I wish to hereby clarify some misunderstandings which may have existed concerning issues referred to in my book and website postings.

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Respect and 'Giri' - The Legacy of Legends

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Thursday, 01 March 2007 01:00

Staring, lost in this simple photograph, I imagine that this is what the eyes of the Samurai of legend must have look like. They are the eyes of men who spent their lives fighting and testing themselves daily with punishing regimes of combat training.

Together they stand; fierce, proud and as strong as ever. They're the last of their kind, a dying breed that sacrificed themselves so that we - the Irish martial artists of today - may enjoy the arts that define us.

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John McSweeney: Ed Parker's Best

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Sunday, 30 September 2001 17:19

I have had many martial arts teachers in my life, most of whom were Chinese. Even those Chinese teachers who could speak a little English did not have a total command of the language, so communication was always a challenge. I could only copy what the teacher showed, leaving most questions unanswered. The questions had to wait until a Chinese student who understood English was able to translate for me.

Read more: John McSweeney: Ed Parker's Best